Side Effects of Alcohol Addiction

Alcohol is like any substance, any drug: It has its effects, and then it has a withdrawal. If you don’t drink a lot, you shouldn’t notice much the next morning, unless you are particularly sensitive to it. However, if you’ve been drinking heavily for years or in many cases decades, then there are a few key symptoms to be aware of, should you decide to give it up.

Initially, you may feel great, newly energized after your firm decision to quit, the promise of an entirely new life ahead of you. Then, after the second day without any alcohol, your body starts to feel the sudden lack of it in your system, not only as a drug, but also as a source of sugar. You will become very tired as your sugar levels plummet, but the worst thing about this is, despite your fatigue, you will find it extremely hard if not impossible to sleep. You may want to see your medical doctor to support you in your efforts, and he/she might even prescribe temporary medicine to help you combat this most cruel of side effects.

However, this cruel side effect, like all dark things, will pass, and you will be able to at least get enough sleep to function. During this period, you should eat well, with a diet high in protein and carbs, even a few sugars, to keep your energy levels up. You might want to go for a run or play some sports – light exercise is often the key to getting out of the addiction.

At around 2 weeks, you will feel physically and emotionally better. Yet it is at this point that you might become complacent and think, ‘I am fine, I can have one drink and I won’t get addicted again.’ Unfortunately, this is very distorted thinking. If you are truly serious about giving up on alcohol, you will surely have serious reasons for doing so: maybe your stomach lining has been eroded by all the booze, maybe your liver is extremely weak from processing so much poison. Remember, alcohol is a poison and if you have an addictive personality, quitting should be for life. There are so many things more important, such as health, family and friends, all of which you tend to lose if you are addicted not only to alcohol, but indeed to any drug.

After a month or two, you will begin to see a lot of pleasant side effects, a return to how a human body should function! Your sleep will be deeper, your mood will improve and your libido will also return to normal. There are countless benefits to beating alcohol addiction, so stick at it, and whatever the temptation, never listen to that little voice who tells you to have ‘one little drink’. It will soon lead to a dozen and all your hard work will be wasted. Your life, your health, your family are all worth much, much more than that.

Alcohol Rehab Centers – What Are They?

This is a rehab center that is focused on helping alcoholics overcome and learn to control the desire to drink. The main target of alcohol rehab centers is to assist their patients in going through the hard period of withdrawal from alcohol along with providing them with coping tool to help them resist drinking in the future. The services of this type of center will usually go beyond support groups and self-help programs. Alcohol rehab centers will offer medical support to ease the physical effects of detoxification and psychological therapy. If you are an inpatient in the program, you would move into the center and receive attention 24/7 as you work to gain control of your alcohol addiction.

There are also outpatient alcohol rehab centers where the patient would choose to remain the home with family members. The outpatient center will establish a regular schedule of counseling, support group activity, and physical examinations to help in the patient’s recovery process. The outpatient approach may be more productive but it all depends on how severe the alcohol addiction is. For severe alcohol addiction, it is best if they choose inpatient treatment.

A key fact that alcohol rehab centers take into account is that alcoholism is not a disease that anyone can cure. Once you are an alcoholic you will always be an alcoholic for the remainder of your life. This is the reason that alcohol rehab centers focus on helping the patients to develop coping skills to help them resist the temptation to consume alcohol. During the beginning of the recovery period, the rehab center will provide monitoring to make it a little easier to deal with the withdrawal symptoms that start soon after your body starts to learn to adjust without drinking. Some of these withdrawal symptoms can be very serious and require medical treatment so this is why the patient is carefully monitored when starting alcohol rehab. Depending on the individual, these symptoms can last from several days to months. The more serious symptoms happen to those that are considered hard drinkers and drink more than eight beers a day.

Alcohol rehab centers will also address both the mental and physical impact of alcoholism along with providing them with support, the sill set, and inspiration to overcome their addiction to alcohol and to keep it in check after the treatment is complete. Many who complete successfully the treatment at alcohol rehab centers will continue to participate in support groups in the community. By doing so it will help them to maintain a network of individuals that understand the temptation to drink alcohol and offer support to them to help them resist the urge to drink. Those that are recovering alcoholics will usually join a support group and attend weekly meetings.

Gay Drug Rehab and Gay Alcohol Rehab Programs in Texas

When a person thinks of the state of Texas, they think big everything. Unfortunately one thing they are not big on is inpatient addiction treatment for the GLBT population. In cites such as Dallas, San Antonio, Fort Worth, Austin, Houston or Abilene, there is a growing gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender population. As with any population growth comes a need for certain healthcare services, in this case, we are speaking of gay friendly addiction treatment or gay friendly drug rehab programs in Texas.

Can’t Gay Men and Lesbians Go to Existing Drug Rehab Programs in Texas?

The answer is yes they can. For gay men and women who are secure in their sexuality, sexual preference and the issues that surround them such as internalized homophobia, homophobia, coming out and others, then any drug rehab, alcohol rehab or addiction treatment program may suffice. Unfortunately, that is not usually the case. Most drug rehabs or alcohol rehab programs are not gay friendly, which means having the addiction treatment services and addiction treatment staff necessary to address the issues mentioned above. Without a gay friendly environment or gay friendly addiction treatment staff, the gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender will probably experience attitudes similar to that of discrimination, prejudice and feelings of being judged.

What Are the Advantages of a Gay Addiction Treatment Program in Texas?

In gay addiction treatment programs or gay drug rehabs, the environment is gay friendly. What that means is that the alcohol rehab or drug rehab will have an addiction treatment staff free of homophobia and judgmental attitudes. There will be addiction treatment services specific to the GLBT population, with a staff dedicated to the same. While the internal healing takes place, the GLBT population still participates in addiction treatment services with the rest of the drug rehab.

If you need help locating a gay friendly drug or alcohol rehab, call the national addiction treatment helpline at 1-800-511-9225 or go to www.gay-rehab.com. If you happen to have a psychiatric problem along with a drug addiction or alcohol addiction go to www.lakeviewhealth.com

9 Reasons Why People Abuse Drugs and Alcohol

1. People suffering from anxiety, bipolar disorder, depression or other mental illnesses use drugs and alcohol to ease their suffering.

Mental illness is such a burden for some people they will try just about anything to relieve the pain. Drugs or alcohol can temporarily make that person feel ‘normal’ again, like they remember feeling in the past. Mental illness is scary for the individual experiencing it, so they are afraid to go to a doctor or family member for help and instead turn to drugs or alcohol to try and solve the problem on their own.

2. People see family members, friends, role models or entertainers using drugs and rationalize that they can too.

As teenagers and young adults, it’s very easy to think that drug and alcohol use can be handled and controlled, especially if they see others they know doing the same thing. It can become easy to rationalize like: ‘hey my friend’s been doing this for a couple years and he seems fine to me.’ Entertainment and music is full of drug references and that can add to the rationalization that drug use is OK sometimes. Individuals with a family history of drug or alcohol abuse are far more likely to develop an addiction than an individual with no family background of addiction.

3. People become bored and think drugs will help.

Boredom is a big factor in drug abuse in teens and young adults. People in this age bracket generally don’t have bills, jobs and all the stresses that go along with adulthood. So it’s easier to become bored and want to try something new and exciting. Drug use is often thought of as a way to escape the mundane world and enter an altered reality.

4. People think drugs will help relieve stress.

Our modern world is full of new strains and stresses that humans have never experienced in the past. Although many things in life are now easier than ever, the burdens are also very high. Simply having a family, maintaining a household, and holding a job are huge stress factors. Some drugs are viewed as a means of relaxation – a way to calm the storm in your mind. Although drugs can be very effective at doing that, there can be serious side effects.

5. People figure if a drug is prescribed by a doctor, it must be ok.

It is easy for an individual to rationalize using a drug because it came from a doctor. The thinking goes like this ‘it was prescribed to someone I know for the same problem I am having, so it makes sense it should work for me too.’ The dangerous part about this rationalization is that this can lead to mixing of drugs, overdose, unintended side effects and/or dependency.

6. People get physically injured and unintentionally get hooked on prescribed drugs.

The people at risk for this are physical laborers, elderly, and anyone with pre-existing injuries. Some people are born with chronic pain due to deformities – others get injured. Doctors then prescribe drugs for what they are intended for and a person can quickly build a dependency. Especially if that drug is making them feel all better, they rationalize that it must be OK to keep taking the drug, which can result in dependency.

7. People use drugs to cover painful memories in their past.

Many people go through extremely traumatic events in their life, many times as children, and turn to drugs to cover the horrible memories. Children are extremely susceptible to trauma, whether physically or emotionally, and those feelings can haunt them into their adulthood. These people could benefit from working with psychologists to help repair their damaged mind. Drugs usually only deepen the issue.

8. People think drugs will help them fit in.

When hanging out with friends, it’s easy for people to want to fit in and seem like one of the crew. If others are drinking or doing drugs, it’s very likely for someone to fall into that trap. Peer pressure can be a tremendous force causing someone to try things they would normally not try on their own.

9. People chase the high they once experienced.

Ask anyone who has tried drugs and they will tell you that it is one of the best feelings of their life. The highs from drugs are so much more extreme than regular everyday joys because most drugs overload the pleasure sensors in your brain. Once a person feels this extreme pleasure, it’s common for that person to become hooked on a drug simply chasing the initial high they once felt. As we all know, this is a vicious cycle that is extremely difficult to break. The highs are equally as powerful as the lows felt when coming off of the drugs.